Deepest ever dive finds plastic bag at bottom of Mariana Trench

Deepest ever dive finds plastic bag at bottom of Mariana Trench

Deepest ever dive finds plastic bag at bottom of Mariana Trench

Details of his trip were released on Monday.

Over 50 years later, Canadian explorer and filmmaker (writer and director of movies such as "Avatar" and the "Titanic") James Cameron took the first solo dive and reached a depth of 35,787 feet (10,908 m)".

The team also discovered brightly colored rocks on the sea floor, potentially formed by microbes, the BBC reports.

It was the voyage to break the record for the world's deepest ocean dive.

To show how deep it is, think about this: If you were to drop Mount Qomolangma, which is more than 8,000 meters tall, into the Mariana Trench, there would still be almost two kilometers of water between the mountain's summit and the surface.

The first-ever expedition to Challenger Deep was made by the United States Navy in 1960.

"Honestly, toward the end, I simply turned the thrusters off, leaned back in the cockpit and enjoyed a tuna fish sandwich while I very slowly drifted just above the bottom of the deepest place on Earth, enjoying the view and appreciating what the team had done technically", Vescovo said. "This submarine and its mother ship. took marine technology to a ridiculously higher new level by diving-rapidly and repeatedly-into the deepest, harshest, area of the ocean".

During their descent, the expedition crew saw a number of sea creatures - a spoon worm at 7000 metres and a pink snailfish at 8000m - and believe they discovered four new species of crustaceans called amphipods, similar to prawns.

Humanity's impact on the planet was also evident with the discovery of plastic pollution.

Victor Vescovo spent four hours exploring the bottom of the trench.

The group is using a submersible called Limiting Factor to complete its challenge.

"Most importantly we have opened the door to the final frontier - the exploration of the hadal zone and the workings of the deepest parts of the world's oceans". It's only fair to assume that undiscovered species and evolution taking its course will unearth new deep-sea life forms in dives like Five Deeps'.

The Pacific Ocean dive is the fourth in Five Deeps Expedition's plan to dive to the bottom of each of the world's five oceans.

"And now in 2019, the Five Deeps Expedition's submersible Limiting Factor was the third", Walsh said, adding, "And I was there to see it".

The Molloy Deep has yet to be explored, and Vescovo's team will be there in August, according to CNN.

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