Record-Breaking 17-Foot Python Found Slithering Around Florida

Record-Breaking 17-Foot Python Found Slithering Around Florida

Record-Breaking 17-Foot Python Found Slithering Around Florida

In a first, scientists have captured a female python that was more than 17-feet-long.

They discovered the female python, more than 17 feet long and weighing 140 pounds, on Friday in Big Cypress National Preserve.

Using radio transmitters to trace male pythons, the Big Cypress National Preserve hunters found the 63.5kg reptile last week.

Thousands of Burmese pythons live in the wild all over South Florida, according to a National Park Service fact sheet.

While pythons of all sizes have been found in the Everglades, a lot of them are between six and 10 feet long.

The team said they caught the snake by tracking a "boyfriend" male snake that had been fitted with a radio transmitter. Rita Garcia, a spokesperson for the Big Cypress National Preserve, said the eggs were destroyed and the snake was euthanized.

In this instance, it led the hunters to a record-breaking snake.

State wildlife officials estimate there are as many as 100,000 pythons - which are native to Southeast Asia - living in the Florida swamps outside Miami.

According to a 2012 study by the United States Geological Survey, the region has witnessed a major drop in the population of raccoons, opossums and bobcats, with several species of rabbits and foxes having almost disappeared altogether. The searchers found only 68 snakes.

Environmentalists have been struggling to find ways to eradicate Burmese pythons, a non-native species, from the 1.5m-acre wilderness since the 1980s, when some were released into the wild as overgrown pets.

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