Here’s what Bangladeshi cricketers says after escaping New Zealand Mosque Shooting

Here’s what Bangladeshi cricketers says after escaping New Zealand Mosque Shooting

Here’s what Bangladeshi cricketers says after escaping New Zealand Mosque Shooting

At least one gunman killed 49 people and wounded more than 20 during Friday prayers at two New Zealand mosques in the country's worst ever mass shooting, which Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern condemned as "a terrorist attack". There were reports that members of the Bangladesh cricket team were also present at the site.

There is no official word on whether the third Test, due to begin at Hagley Oval on Saturday morning, will go ahead as scheduled.

Bangladesh Cricket team was about to enter the mosque when the incident took place.

Bangladesh Cricket Board president Nazmul Hassan Papon said nobody expected such an event in New Zealand, but the shootings highlighted the fact that teams from south Asia deserve the same level of security when they travel as their home countries provide to visiting teams.

According to Nine News, several hundred people are believed to have been inside the Masjid Al Noor mosque at the time of the shooting and Canterbury Police have confirmed that they are responding to the "critical incident".

After a terrifying wait, described in vivid Twitter posts, players were able to leave the bus and walk through Hagley Park to Hagley Oval where, deeply shaken, they waited in their locker room until police allowed them to return to their hotel.

"We just want to know if they are dead or alive", Mohammed told the officer.

Bangladesh, with its hectic efforts, managed to save the country from militancy and terrorism. Bangladeshi team who escaped the death by a whisker have been shattered with the terrifying experience that took place at the two mosques in Christchurch. "I couldn't put it into words how I'm feeling right now", said Williams, wiping away tears as he spoke. Team manager Khaled Mashud told espncricinfo.com the players had a lucky escape. Almost 50 people were killed in the attacks on the two mosques. Certainly, it also made the New Zealand people frighten, as things like such are always scary. They're shocked like everyone else.

"We were in the bus about eight to 10 minutes".

"What we faced here, it will take some time for us to get over what we suffered", Tamim said before boarding the flight for Bangladesh.

"We are shocked and appalled, as I'm sure all New Zealanders are", he added.

Mashud said about 17 Bangladeshi players and team staff on the bus watched as blood-soaked victims staggered from the building.

Chief executive Jeremy Curwin said Canterbury Cricket had consulted with the players, who were given the opportunity to make their decision whether to play the final game as individuals or collectively.

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