Black boxes recovered from Ethiopian Airlines jet as crash investigation continues

Black boxes recovered from Ethiopian Airlines jet as crash investigation continues

Black boxes recovered from Ethiopian Airlines jet as crash investigation continues

The focus on Boeing has also been intense. Accident reports show most are caused by unique combinations of technical and human factors.

It ploughed into a field near Tulu Fara village outside the town of Bishoftu, some 60 km southeast of Addis Ababa.

Some stated they didn't get answers following the meetings they held with the Ethiopian Airlines authorities. "However, this investigation has just begun and to date we have not been provided data to draw any conclusions or take any actions".

October's Lion Air crash is also unresolved, but attention has focused so far on the role of a software system created to push the plane down as well as airline training and maintenance.

Among major crash investigations the BEA has led were the 2015 plunge of a Germanwings jet - whose black boxes revealed that the co-pilot had deliberately slammed the plane into an Alpine mountainside after locking the captain out of the cockpit.

"The strain on the mission, I know what it's like", said Andreychuk, a former ambassador.

"I had my nerves because there was no one to help me go fast", Mavropoulos wrote on now-viral Facebook post translated from Greek.

Meanwhile, Europe and India have joined a wave of countries grounding the Boeing 737 Max.

However, there is no way of knowing if anything other than coincidence is to blame.

Furthermore, eyewitnesses told CNN that they saw the plane swerving, dipping and emitting smoke as it came down.

Representatives of Zaka International have been making their way to the crash site and have been in contact with the Israeli consulate in Addis Ababa.

Little is known about the Ethiopian Airlines pilots flying the jet on Sunday morning.

The pilot "reported back to air traffic controllers that he was having flight control problems", but cited no other issues, GebreMariam told the Wall Street Journal.

According to the man, who goes by the name Antonis Mavropoulos, he had arrived at the airport late for the flight headed to Addis Ababa. What particular problems he cited in those communications are unclear.

Andreychuk said embassy staff first had to figure out who was on the plane. All three carriers vouched for the safety of Max aircraft on Wednesday.

The US Federal Aviation Administration reiterated Tuesday that the aircraft is safe. The world's largest airline, American Airlines, has 24 of the planes in its fleet.

The aircraft manufacturer said in a statement that the software enhancement will be ready no later than April this year.

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