News FaceTime bug lets you eavesdrop if the other party doesn't answer

News FaceTime bug lets you eavesdrop if the other party doesn't answer

News FaceTime bug lets you eavesdrop if the other party doesn't answer

In the meantime, any iPhone that's ringing with an incoming FaceTime request is potentially listening in to its surroundings and sending the data back to the caller.

Right now FaceTime is a great way to keep up with what friends and family are doing - without them knowing. What's more, you could do the same to me.

For those who are rightfully concerned about this bug, my suggestion is that you disable FaceTime immediately until Apple releases a patch. I was able to get it to work on a variety of iOS devices ranging from a very new iPhone XS to a very beat-up iPhone 5, but all were running iOS 12.1 and above. While the call is dialing, swipe up from the bottom of the screen, tap "Add Person", and add your own phone number.

Anyone can call you on FaceTime and hear audio or see video from your phone before you answer. For them, it looks like you're trying to FaceTime with them, but there's no indication that you can hear them (or, if you make noise, they can hear you).

Taking the flaw a step further, The Verge is reporting that if the recipient of the conference call presses the power or volume button to ignore the call, video, as well as audio, is broadcasted without the recipient's knowledge. Later, BuzzFeed reported that they could also access the front facing camera and that Apple stated that they are "aware of this issue and we have identified a fix that will be released in a software update later this week". Otherwise, people cannot only listen in on what you are doing, but in some cases also see what you are doing. Users might want to disable FaceTime until then. You'll get better sleep either way.

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