DC sues Facebook over Cambridge Analytica scandal

DC sues Facebook over Cambridge Analytica scandal

DC sues Facebook over Cambridge Analytica scandal

The District of Columbia has fired the latest legal salvo against Facebook with a lawsuit seeking to punish the social networking company for allowing data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica to improperly access data from as many as 87 million users.

Also in March, the Federal Trade Commission took the unusual step of announcing that it had opened an investigation into whether the company had violated a 2011 consent decree, citing media reports that raise what it called "substantial concerns about the privacy practices of Facebook".

The complaint filed Wednesday by Washington, D.C., Attorney General Karl Racine alleges that Facebook misled users about the security of their data and failed for years to properly monitor third-party apps.

Attorney General Karl Racine said company's practices exposed 340,000 District residents - almost half of D.C.'s population - to potential "manipulation for political purposes".

The scandal has triggered a series of investigations and broad review by Facebook on how it shares user data with third parties.

The lawsuit comes as Facebook continues to face criticism around the world for mismanaging its users' personal information.

Zuckerberg owns a 13% stake in Facebook, which this year has been beset by crises including the Cambridge Analytica scandal, accusations of mismanagement, a shareholder revolt, and questions over inappropriate content.

Facebook offered separate privacy settings around 2013 to control what friends on the network could see and what data could be accessed by apps, enabling the quiz and other services to collect details about users' Facebook friends without many of them realizing it, according to the lawsuit. "Mr. Zuckerberg told us that he was going to stop doing this, and now we find out yet again that Facebook has sold our private messages to other companies for bucketloads of money".

Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee that heard testimony from Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg in September, has previously put forth several potential measures for regulating tech companies.

"Facebook has taken relatively little action commensurate with the action on the site", said Scott Simpson, public advocacy director ofMuslim Advocates, one of the organizations that led the development of the letter.

"Facebook failed to protect the privacy of its users and deceived them about who had access to their data and how it was used", Rancine said in a statement.

The special arrangements are detailed in hundreds of pages of Facebook documents obtained by The New York Times.

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