Perseid Meteor Shower peaks Sunday night

Perseid Meteor Shower peaks Sunday night

Perseid Meteor Shower peaks Sunday night

This year's shower lasts from July 14 to August 24, but it reaches its peak from 4 p.m. ET on August 12 through 4 a.m. ET on August 13, according to NASA JPL.

"This year, we'll be lucky the moon won't be shining most of the night", Bjerke said.

The annual Perseid meteor shower happens this weekend.

People love the Perseid meteor shower because it's something they can view without any equipment; in fact a telescope is a waste of time, because the meteorites fly by so fast, Twarog said.

Stargazers are hoping for clear skies this weekend so they can see the Perseids in all their glory.

This Perseid meteor shower will take place during a almost new moon-meaning it won't interfere with the show-and is expected to be the best meteor shower this year.

And while they take his name, the meteors don't actually come from the stars in the Perseus constellation, which are hundreds of light-years away. However, this year with a dark clear sky, it's possible to see an unbelievable light show. Annual meteor showers are created when Earth's orbit around the sun intersects with the wake of a comet's orbit, and debris thrown off from the tail hits our atmosphere and burns up upon entry.

In Manitoba, the best time to see the meteors is at around 2 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday, Pahud said, adding any time around midnight will be good for viewing.

If you are in a city, try to get somewhere at least somewhat sheltered from lights, maybe a park or backyard.

Bill Cooke - NASA meteor expertHow many meteors will we see? You can tell if a meteor is a Perseid by following its direction backwards and, if it's coming from the direction of Perseus, it's a Perseid.

When is the best time to see the meteor shower?

It takes 20 minutes pretty much for your eyes to adjust to the dark and then you'll say oh there's more of them now. No. The meteor shower will peak overnight into Monday, with 70 meteors visible each hour, according to the Royal Astronomical Society.

You will be in for a treat as this means roughly one per minute. However, with a little planning and some patience, you can get some truly memorable images.

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