CDC monitoring measles cases in 21 states, including North Carolina

CDC monitoring measles cases in 21 states, including North Carolina

CDC monitoring measles cases in 21 states, including North Carolina

More than 100 people from 21 states have contracted measles in a nationwide outbreak, the CDC has announced.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that in 2018, 107 D.C. residents and people from multiple USA states have had the virus as of July 14.

The CDC says the majority of people who got measles were not vaccinated.

Measles is considered highly contagious and can be spread through coughs and sneezes. Symptoms show up in 10 to 14 days after exposure. The total number of cases that year is the highest number since measles elimination was declared in the U.S. in 2000.

The CDC says measles are still common in many parts of the world, including certain countries in Europe, Asia, the Pacific and Africa.

States included in the report are Arkansas, California, Tennessee, North Carolina, Kansas, Illinois, Florida, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Washington.

In all of 2017, for example, 118 people from 15 states and DC had measles. A red or reddish-brown rash also appears, first on the face at the hairline and spreading down to the entire body. The rash has a particular name: "morbilliform", meaning "measles-like", and begins as flat red spots or bumps which come together in large reddish areas.

According to the CDC, some people may suffer from severe complications, such as pneumonia and brain swelling which could result in hospitalization or death. Worldwide, about 20 million people get measles each year, according to the agency.

The measles vaccine - known as the MMR or measles, mumps and rubella vaccine - is very effective.

Dr. Ann Hennessey, a pediatrician with Mercy Clinic, has encouraged all of her patients to get vaccinated.

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